The locust invasions devastating Niger

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Copyright: Panos

It is the end of December 2016, with clear skies over Niger. But as 2017 draws near prospects are grim for some 500 residents in Bani Kosseye, a village 80km from the capital Niamey. Agricultural production has been poor here, and families’ meagre stocks are expected to run out within a few weeks. People already fear famine. Continue reading

Where to find CABI’s open-access information on fall armyworm

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The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is making headlines worldwide for all the wrong reasons. The caterpillar crop pest, native to the Americas, was reported in Africa for the first time last year and is now rapidly marching across the continent. It is a voracious pest of maize and other staple crops and has already destroyed tens of thousands of hectares of farmland. As such, it risks devastating smallholder livelihoods throughout Africa. Given that CABI scientists predict it could reach Europe and Asia in a matter of years, it looks set to quickly become a global problem.

The case for action against fall armyworm is overwhelming. On the ground, CABI will support national extension services to help farmers identify the pest quickly and accurately, contribute to awareness-raising and conduct studies to work out the best ways to control it that are not overly dependent on insecticides. Alongside these efforts, CABI also has a range of freely-available materials to help people understand and manage fall armyworm. Continue reading

Pakistan’s papaya pest squished through biocontrol

Papaya farmers
Copyright: G.M.B. Akash / Pano

 

A severe infestation of the papaya mealybug (Paracoccus marginatus) nearly wiped out papaya orchards in Pakistan before this largely farming South Asian country decided to replace conventional chemical pesticides that were ineffective, with natural predators that proved to be successful.  Continue reading

Invasive species – telling the story of the hidden threat to livelihoods

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The Global Forum on Agricultural Research (GFAR) has blogged about CABI’s activities in its ‘Partner Spotlight’ feature (12-15). One of these was our new invasive species programme which is re-posted here.

Millions of people living in rural communities around the world face problems with invasive species –animals, diseases, insects and plants – that are out of control and have resulted in damage costing more than an estimated US $1.4 trillion globally (Pimentel et al 2001). Yet, while we may have heard about the threats of losing biodiversity, some may have never considered how the addition of a species could be a detriment to agriculture and farmers. Continue reading

Tackling invasive species to protect farmer incomes and livelihoods

Elias Kamuga“I have suffered [crop] losses amounting to 90%. I have no other source of income apart from tomato farming. I was relying on this crop to feed my family. I have nothing to do now other than try to think of what to do next.”

Elias Kamuga, Farmer, Kenya

Elias is a smallholder farmer from Kenya. Every year he sells his tomato crop at the local market, which gives him enough money to feed his family. But the arrival of a tomato pest to his region in Kenya has stopped that. The pest – a moth called a tomato leaf miner or Tuta absoluta – was recently introduced to Africa. This pest is an invasive species, and is destroying people’s livelihoods.

In 2015, Elias started to notice his tomatoes were being damaged by this pest. He tried taking them to market, but customers said they had too many holes and spots and were no good. He could not sell his produce. He believes he lost 90% of his tomato crop to the pest, and had no other source of income. Elias tried fighting this tomato pest with chemicals but they did not work. Elias now has to find another way to earn money. Thousands of farmers are in his position.

Invasive species, like Tuta absoluta, are devastating livelihoods. Tomatoes are one of the most widely cultivated crops in sub-Saharan Africa, grown in the backyards of almost every home. This important cash crop and source of nutrition is now being threatened by the recent arrival of the pest.

Tuta absoluta is rapidly moving across the African continent, decimating crops in Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania. It has recently reached Nigeria, where a state of emergency has been declared – the pest has destroyed an estimated US$5.1 million of tomatoes and forced at least one major tomato processing plant to close. Growers do not know how to control it and many have abandoned tomato farming altogether. The race is on to prevent its spread with management schemes planned to limit its devastation.

Since 2014, CABI helped governments in Africa halt the Tuta absoluta threat and continues to do so. We are currently helping countries like Burundi, Kenya, Nigeria and Tanzania understand how they can best prepare prior to a pest invasion and are delivering practical knowledge on how to manage the pest once it has arrived. To address the recent severe outbreak in Kaduna State, Nigeria, we have provided the government with a technical brief on the tomato leaf miner together with available management experiences to help them develop a control strategy.

In 2015, we launched an important initiative to raise awareness of the threat of invasive species to the livelihoods of the rural poor. Our aim is to draw partners together from around the world to bring pest management solutions that exist already to the people who need them. We included Tuta absoluta as one of the priority targets for coordinated management. Our goal is to protect rural communities in developing countries from the devastating impacts of specific invasive species.

See Elias’ story.