The locust invasions devastating Niger

locust-invasion-in-niger

Copyright: Panos

It is the end of December 2016, with clear skies over Niger. But as 2017 draws near prospects are grim for some 500 residents in Bani Kosseye, a village 80km from the capital Niamey. Agricultural production has been poor here, and families’ meagre stocks are expected to run out within a few weeks. People already fear famine. Read more of this post

CABI’s new biocontrol video

biiocontrol-video

CABI has produced a new video which focuses on how we are using biological control, or biocontrol, to manage some of the worst invasive species that are affecting farmers’ livelihoods.

Read more of this post

CABI’s ISC datasheets contribute to regulatory action against high-risk freshwater invasive species in the USA

iscblog-pic-2
Rutilus rutilus (roach); adult fish on display. Subaqueous Vltava, Prague Czech Republic. April, 2011
(Copyright: released into the public Domain by Larel Jakubec/Prague, Czech Republic)

Aquatic invasive species threaten aquatic resources by negatively impacting native organisms and altering ecosystems. They have a competitive advantage over native species because they lack natural enemies to control their spread, they grow and reproduce rapidly, and also adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions.

Read more of this post

Invasive alien species (IAS) threaten livelihoods and biodiversity globally

img_5068

Invasions from non-native plants, animals and pathogens threaten the economies of the world’s poorest nations, according to a new study.

The study, published in Nature Communications (‘Global threats from invasive alien species in the twenty-first century and national response capacities’) found that one-sixth of the world’s land is highly vulnerable to invasion, including substantial areas in developing countries and global biodiversity hotspots.

Read more of this post

CABI at EcoSummit 2016

EcoSummit 2a

CABI promoted its new invasive species initiative at this year’s EcoSummit event which took place in Montpellier, France, from 29 August – 1 September. CABI’s latest initiative aims to tackle the issue of invasive species to improve the lives of 50 million farmers in Africa and Asia.

Launched in Copenhagen in 1996, the event provides a platform for ecological scientists and researchers from around the world to share new knowledge and discuss sustainable solutions to global environmental and ecological challenges. This year’s EcoSummit conference focused on terrestrial ecosystems, especially fragile systems that are less resilient to climate change and the impact that human activities are having on the environment – especially agriculture. The increasing global demand for food was also discussed and how intensified agriculture to meet this demand can adversely affect ecosystems.

CABI’s work on invasive species was highly relevant here as many invasive species cause the loss of natural biodiversity and alter global ecosystems. CABI’s expertise in tackling invasive species in order to promote environmental sustainability, livelihoods and food security is a significant contribution to solving global environmental challenges.

Julien Lamontagne-Godwin was one of CABI’s representatives at the conference. He said: “This conference is vital to showcase the myriad avenues of research in ecology, and is a vital tool to describe and remind us of the importance of a healthy ecosystem for our way of life. Many discussions we had with top scientists here highlighted the value of CABI’s knowledge platforms, such as our Invasive Species Compendium. These conversations also helped us add depth and significance to our new livelihoods initiative on invasive species.”

CABI has been working on invasive species for over 100 years, exploring measures to prevent, mitigate and manage invasive species on a global level. Through a selection of different sustainable techniques such as biological control, CABI tackles some of the worst invasive species that negatively impact terrestrial ecosystems and impact the livelihoods of farmers who depend directly on the ecosystem for their sustenance.

New European Union IAS Regulation

 

Hydrocotyle ranunculoides

Floating pennywort (Hydrocotyle ranunculoides): on the EU species of Union concern list and a target for biocontrol (Credit: Kate Constantine, CABI)

Invasive alien species are a major threat worldwide, impacting upon millions of livelihoods and threatening biodiversity. The situation is worsening, due in no small part to increased global trade and transport. The economic costs of IAS can be vast: worldwide, invasive species are estimated to cost US$1.4 trillion per year – close to 5% of global GDP.

In the European Union alone, invasive alien species (IAS) are estimated to cost €12-20 billion a year.

In response to this threat, the European Union adopted Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 which makes compulsory the management of key IAS that are of concern to the region. Methods include limitation of spread, eradication of early invasions and active management of established IAS. A list of 37 species to be included under the regulation was approved by EU Member States in December 2015 and has recently come into force (Regulation (EU) 2016/1141). It includes 23 animals and 14 plants whose current and potential impacts across the region will mean that collaborative and concerted action is required across the EU.

This is part of the EU’s biodiversity strategy which aims to halt the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services in the EU by 2020 and is in line with the Convention on Biological Diversity’s (CBD) Aichi Targets, particularly Target 9:

“By 2020, invasive alien species and pathways are identified and prioritized, priority species are controlled or eradicated, and measures are in place to manage pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment.”

At CABI, we have been working on invasive species at a global scale for decades and are experts in their management using both traditional methods and through biological control. This new legislation is welcome; recognising the serious threats that invasive species pose and imposing compulsory measures to lessen the spread and impacts of IAS in the EU.

The three Cs of the Invasives’ programme development: concepts, compromise and coffee

Since March 2016, I have been working as the programme support manager for the multi-sectorial development initiative called the Invasives programme. Our new Invasives initiative will be undertaking regional, national and local technical and partnership activities to deal with some of the worst biological invasions that are threatening livelihoods in poor rural areas. As we look to leverage the successful Plantwise initiative (www.plantwise.org), the Invasives programme team is looking to build additional partnerships in the private, public and civil society sectors. Needless to say, from a personal point of view, it has been a steep learning curve!

But it has been productive! In 3 months, we have managed to finalise the strategy (the first version of it anyway), develop a logical framework, partnership and budget documents, a theory of change, and link our activities to CABI’s global gender strategy and monitoring and evaluation process.

How did we achieve this, all in time for the CABI review conference in July? Through the excellent combination of concepts, compromise and coffee

Let me explain.

Concepts

You cannot develop a multi sectorial global programme without a strong conceptual basis.

The Invasives programme definitely has strong roots: as an organisation, CABI has over 100 years of experience dealing with problems species in agriculture around the world, notwithstanding staff’s academic and practitioner knowledge is immense working on projects throughout the globe. This experience is underpinned by a world leading invasive species information database: the Invasive Species Compendium (www.cabi.org/ISC). What is more, the programme’s goals are complementary with CABI’s largest programme to date, the prize winning Plantwise initiative. Indeed, our partnerships with local partners as well as the analysis of plant clinic information will be crucial for the development of timely invasive species integrated pest management interventions in local areas. The approach at a regional level means we can deal with cross border issues, whilst our locally focused activities means helping vulnerable groups out of poverty through job creation and/or better agricultural yields. The core team developing the programme, the technical management teams, composed of 8 senior staff, headed by Dr Sean Murphy, have been given the responsibility of developing the programme’s work packages. Their intimate knowledge of invasive species and international development will be invaluable for the smooth running of the programme in its infancy.

Compromise

Whilst our experience and knowledge on the Invasive species theme is definitely an advantage, it also means CABI contains some opposing views on how to achieve the programme’s goals. Hence the second “c”: compromise

As a programme manager, the role is principally to keep the programme moving forward. This inevitably means you will have to manage conflict between ideologies. For example, the programme from a marketing or commercial sense might stray far from what a research professional might see as a successful programme. A donor-focused professional will want to see different aims than a development profession working in the field. Indeed, it is the programme manager’s role to listen, analyse and suggest compromises. A degree in psychology would be helpful, let alone one in ecological economics, social dynamics or conservation agriculture (luckily I have one of those!). A programme manager’s role, while content driven, will most likely earn his/her corn by his ability to diplomatically find a solution and move forwards.

Coffee

It is somewhat ironic that a programme manager’s staple drink is one of the key crops in conservation agriculture and commodities. Indeed, coffee is one of the sole (soul?) constants in a complex management role. Do you think I am overstating it? Try the 3 day workshops to hash out logical frameworks with technical teams, tight deadlines to learn about, and draft, a programme theory of change, organising milestones, integrating gender and monitoring and evaluation strategies, fixing and predicting budgets and partnerships… Oh yes, add a new-born child and the business end of a PhD in the mix, and you can understand why coffee has become a pretty important part of my life!

The programme is in good shape, with strong endorsements from all sides. The programme strategy will be out very soon. That is enough of a reward for now.

That is, until we roll out the initiative and help 50 million farmers improve their livelihoods.