New edition of weed biocontrol catalogue gives information on more than 2000 releases

Originally posted on The Plantwise Blog:

Himalayan balsam infected with Puccinia rust Himalayan balsam infected with Puccinia rust – a method of biocontrol being used in the UK. Photo credit: Rob Tanner © CABI

The fifth edition of Biological Control of Weeds: A World Catalogue of Agents and Their Target Weeds has been released after years of literature searches and the involvement of 125 weed biocontrol specialists.

The publication of this catalogue, available as a searchable online database and as a PDF book, was led by Mark Schwarzländer, University of Idaho CALS professor of entomology and biological control of weeds (and a former CABI researcher), and current CABI biological weed researcher, Hariet Hinz. Several prominent invasive species researchers co-edited the catalogue, including CABI’s Chief Scientist, Matthew Cock.

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Beware! Pests on the high seas

Originally posted on The Plantwise Blog:

Contributed by Roger Day, CABI

If you put all the shipping containers in the world end to end, the line would go round the world 5 times. So a problem with a very small proportion of them is still a pretty big problem.

One such problem is that when a container is being packed with cargo, pests can get in and hitch a free ride to another country. So in 2008, the 3rd Session of the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures (CPM3) directed an expert working group to start developing an international standard for “Minimizing pest movement by sea containers”.

When a sea container is being packed with cargo, pests can get in and hitch a free ride to another country which can create considerable problems. When a sea container is being packed with cargo, pests can get in and hitch a free ride to another country, creating considerable problems. Photo: http://www.europhoning.fr

CPM 5 (2010) directed that work on the topic was urgent, and a draft standard was produced, but at CPM7, after lengthy discussions late…

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Tuta absoluta, a new invasive invading India

corinprattcabi:

Additional information about Tuta absoluta can be found on the CABI Invasive Species Compendium http://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/49260

Originally posted on The Plantwise Blog:

Tuta absoluta (commonly known as tomato leaf miner) is a devastating pest of tomato which originated from South America. It can breed between 10-12 generations a year and each female can lay upto 250-300 eggs in her life time.  This pest has been very quickly crossing borders and devastating tomato production in both protected and open fields. The infestation of this pest is also reported on other solanaceous crops like potato, aubergine and common beans. The pest has spread from South America to several parts of Europe, entire Africa and has now spread to India. This pest is observed for the first time infesting tomato crop in Maharashtra, India reported by Indian Council of Agricultural Research. It has a potential to cause up to 90% loss of yield and fruit quality under greenhouse and field conditions. Plants are damaged by larval stages by direct feeding on leaves, stems, buds, calyces, young fruit, or…

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New in February 2014 from the ISC

In February 2014 the following datasheets were published on CABI’s Invasive Species Compendium (ISC). You can explore the open-access ISC here: www.cabi.org/isc

Drosophila suzukii – The damage caused by D. suzukii larvae renders fruit unmarketable. In 2008 economic losses (based on maximum reported yield losses) for California, Oregon and Washington were estimated at 40% for blueberries, 50% for caneberries, 33% for cherries and 20% for strawberries. Production in these three states could sustain $511 million in damages annually because of D. suzukii. D. suzukii produces up to five times more hemocytes than D. melanogaster, making it significantly more resistant to wasp parasitism and making it less likely for indigenous specialized parasitoids to shift host onto it.

Drosophila suzukii ISC datasheet

Drosophila suzukii Invasive Species Compendium datasheet

Rattus rattus – R. rattus has directly caused or contributed to the extinction of many species of wildlife including birds, small mammals, reptiles, invertebrates and plants, especially on islands. The primary economic impact of R. rattus relates to agricultural and horticultural damage. It is capable of destroying up to 30% of crops annually. Phylogenetic restructuring of the ‘Rattus rattus complex’ (comprising the oceanic and Asian groups) is on-going. Based on molecular evidence, there are multiple species within what has historically been identified as Rattus rattus.

Leonurus japonicus – L. japonicus is a highly invasive weed widely naturalized in tropical and subtropical ecosystems. It commonly grows as a weed in waste places, disturbed sites and along roadsides and as an ornamental in gardens and yards. L. japonicus also invades pastures and arable land as well as coastal and dry forests. In a recent work, Xiong, et al. (2013) described the chemical composition and the antibacterial activity of essential oils from different parts of L. japonicus. These essential oils showed antibacterial activity against various Gram-positive bacteria.

Other invasive species datasheets recently published include…

Chamaecrista nictitans

Medicago polymorpha

Pantherophis guttatus

Amphisbaena fuliginosa

Datura ferox

Schilbe mystus

Protopterus aethiopicus

Horizon Scanning for Invasive Species

In this, the era of globalisation, increases in international trade, transport and travel have driven an upsurge in the diversity and volume of non-native species introductions to new areas worldwide. Introduced plant, animal and pathogen species may fail to establish in a new range, and where they do establish, may be environmentally benign. However, there is potential for introduced non-native species to become invasive, even after a (sometimes extensive) period of time without apparent negative impacts.

Preventing the introduction and establishment of a species considered to be an invasion risk is key to mitigating its potential impacts in a new area. For this to be done effectively, it is vitally important that countries conduct horizon scanning initiatives to determine the non-native species likely to arrive, to evaluate the threat posed should the organism become established, to determine by which pathway(s) the organism may be introduced and where appropriate, to convey to the competent authority the requirement for rapid response strategies to alert list species. The recent European Union (EU) draft regulation which aims to legislate for the control of invasive non-native species in the EU is likely to be focused on a list of priority non-native species. A significant number of the species on this list are likely to be alert species not yet present in the region, but which will be determined as threats through the horizon scanning and prioritisation process. The outcomes of this horizon scanning process are likely to be of great interest and importance to various concerned parties across the European continent and beyond, and will certainly be subject to close scrutiny.

Horizon -  Norma Desmond, Flickr

Are invasive species on the horizon?
Photo: Norma Desmond, Flickr

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Originally posted on The Plantwise Blog:

A species of whitefly that transmits cassava mosaic virus has been detected in South Africa for the first time. The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci is a cryptic species complex containing some important agricultural pests and virus vectors. The term ‘cryptic species complex’ means that Bemisia tabaci is considered to be a complex of at least 24 different species that look almost identical but are in fact genetically different.  Researchers from a range of organisations including the University of Johannesburg, the University of Witwatersrand and ARC-Vegetable and Ornamental Plant Institute conducted surveys to investigate the diversity and distribution of Bemisia tabaci species in 8 provinces in South Africa. The study aimed to update the information regarding the different Bemisia tabaci types present in the country.

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corinprattcabi:

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Originally posted on The Plantwise Blog:

Researchers are working towards developing a cost effective solution to controlling  Ash Dieback fungal disease, a major threat to 80 million ash trees in the UK. As part of the plan to tackle Ash Dieback and other invasive pests and diseases, the government has formulated a team of ten internationally recognised experts in plant health, forestry and wider related disciplines as part of the Tree Health and Plant Biosecurity Taskforce. The taskforce includes three entomologists, Professor Charles Godfray from Oxford University, Professor Simon Leather from Harper Adams University College and Professor John Mumford from Imperial College as well as a number of social and environmental scientists.

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