New in February 2015 from the ISC

In February 2015 the following datasheets were published on CABI’s Invasive Species Compendium (ISC). You can explore the open-access ISC here: www.cabi.org/isc

February

Furcraea foetida (Mauritius hemp) – native to Central America, this evergreen perennial has been introduced worldwide as an ornamental, for its fibre and for erosion control. However, F. foetida can grow up to three metres across, compete with surrounding vegetation and displace native plants, and as a result has become dominant on many tropical islands and atolls around the world.

Hypostomus plecostomus (suckermouth catfish) – as a popular ornamental fish, H. plecostomus has been introduced to the Americas, Asia and Europe from its native range in northern South America. But this armour-plated, egg-guarding, hypoxia-proof omnivore can quickly monopolise resources and inhibit other aquatic organisms. By building nests in river banks and sediment, the suckermouth catfish contributes to bank erosion and increased turbidity, with associated environmental and socioeconomic impacts.

Bythotrephes longimanus (spiny waterflea) – the invasion of the crustacean B. longimanus in the North America Great Lakes has resulted in a marked decline of both the density and diversity of many copepod zooplankton species, with long-lasting effects in invaded systems. It has also been responsible for a large-scale shift in the zooplankton community and competes directly with planktivorous fish for food.

Other invasive species datasheets recently published include:

Adenostoma fasciculatum (chamise)

Adiantum hispidulum (rosy maidenhair fern)

Belonesox belizanus (pike killifish)

Bromus hordeaceus (soft brome)

Buddleja asiatica (dog tail)

Desmodium incanum (creeping beggerweed)

Euphorbia hypericifolia (graceful spurge)

Hymenachne amplexicaulis (hymenachne)

Lepomis microlophus (redear sunfsh)

Mikania scandens (climbing hempvine)

Polistes dominulus (European paper wasp)

Salvelinus namaycush (lake trout)

Simosyrphus grandicornis (flower fly)

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