New in November 2014 from the ISC

In November 2014 the following datasheets were published on CABI’s Invasive Species Compendium (ISC). You can explore the open-access ISC here: www.cabi.org/isc

Clerodendrum indicum Invasive Species Compendium datasheet

Clerodendrum indicum Invasive Species Compendium datasheet

Clerodendrum indicum (Turk’s turban) – this small shrub, native to temperate and tropical Asia, has been deliberately introduced principally to the Americas as an ornamental. Having long since escaped from cultivation, it is now established in the neotropics. Rapid growth and the ability to reproduce by seeds, rooted cuttings and suckers have contributed to its spread, although C. indicum does not appear to be as invasive as other species in the Clerodendrum cohort.

Potamopyrgus antipodarum (New Zealand mudsnail) – native to New Zealand, this aquatic snail has been introduced to Europe, North America, Australia and Asia. Females are parthenogenetic, meaning they can reproduce without males. This allows a new population to be founded by a single female – and with an average of 230 offspring per adult per year, P. antipodarum can quickly become very abundant. Its ability to survive desiccation for several days allows this snail to be spread by birds and anglers. It is currently considered invasive in Spain, USA and Australia.

Cosmos caudatus (wild cosmos) – thanks to its prolific seed production wild cosmos can cause chaos in the tropics, where its fast growth and height (up to 2.5 m tall) makes it difficult to control. Thought to be native to southern Mexico, it is now found in Asia, Africa, throughout the Americas, Australia and some Pacific islands. C. caudatus is particularly adept at spreading in disturbed areas, pastures and roadsides.

 

Other invasive species datasheets recently published include:

Cyclosorus parasiticus (parasitic maiden fern)
Vulpia myuros (annual fescue)
Clerodendrum bungei (rose glorybower)

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